5 INFP Traits Many People Don’t Understand

As INFPs we live in the potentiality rather than reality

Nina M. Q.
7 min readMay 8, 2021

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Photo by Sebastian Unrau on Unsplash

Being an INFP means it’s quite rare to feel understood. Actually, I think the first time I really ever felt understood was when I took the Myers Briggs test for the first time and read my results.

Suddenly I got an outside perspective on my personality and found the words to describe why I often felt so out of place. Which, paradoxically, made me feel a lot less out of place.

When I was younger I would often try to adapt to the extrovert norm and would often feel like there was something wrong with me. This was before books like Quite by Susan Cain, and the general awareness level of introversion vs. extraversion was not what it is today.

In my teens, I often struggled to fit in. Perhaps nobody noticed, but I never really felt that I belonged.

When I read about the INFP personality, I felt a weird sense of relief. There were more people like me. I’m not a weirdo. On the contrary, INFPs display some pretty lovely personality traits, if I may say so myself.

A Mediator (INFP) is someone who possesses the Introverted, Intuitive, Feeling, and Prospecting personality traits. These rare personality types tend to be quiet, open-minded, and imaginative, and they apply a caring and creative approach to everything they do. 16personlities.com

Today, I embrace who I am and how I function, and I try to live my life accordingly. Still, there are some of my personality traits that I find other people struggle to wrap their heads around.

Now, of course I understand that all INFP people are not the same. In fact, we’re probably less alike than many other Myer Briggs personalities, considering our strong individualism.

Nevertheless, based on reading the accounts of others, I will go out on a limb and assume that many INFPSs share these traits with me. And those who do, have probably come across the same puzzled and surprised looks on other people’s faces when trying to explain them.

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